Know Your Dictators 2

FILE PHOTO: Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban arrives at the EU summit in Brussels

Hungary

Viktor Orbán

These are notes taken from Paul Lendval writing in The Atlantic.

Timeline

1989

Orbán was a young man, unshaven with long hair (26 years old)

Fidesz – He was a member of this youth group. He gave a 6 ½ minute speech calling for free elections and withdrawal of soviet troops.

Instant fame.

1992

By the age of 30 he was in control of Fidesz

1994

Moved his party (Fidesz) to the right

1998

Fidesz won the election and Orbán became the youngest PM in the history of Hungary.

1998-2002

Prime Minister of Hungary

2010 – present

Prime Minister again and expected to win on April 8th(Lendval’s article was written on April 7th, the day before the election. Orbán won the election.

Ideology

Orbán began as a liberal, a “fiery left-wing atheist”. He was very poor as a child. He worked with the Soros Foundation and even took his family to Oxford under Soros Foundation sponsorship but he returned to Hungary after only 4 months in England.

Now Orbán is a right-wing populist leader.

Ethnic Nationalism and Deep-rooted Corruption mark his rule in Hungary, a return to past practice.

Orbán is busy now “concentrating power, eliminating constitutional safeguards, reshaping the state in his image (?), and posing a potential threat to even the future of the EU.”

Orbán is now a multimillionaire.

He wants Hungary to be a Christian nation (true, but also a message to the people of Hungary about how he will treat the issue of migrants and refugees from Syria who are usually not Christians)

He calls his own brand of government “illiberal democracy”.

Fidesz explores the “national question” – there is still much “bitterness” about the unnatural divisions of the people of Hungary caused by a post WW I treaty. Many nurse feelings of “national humiliation”.

Orbán runs on “faith in the homeland and Christian values” (know your peeps)

Policy

Orbán has filled state power positions with loyal supporters.

He uses Immigration as a “wedge issue”, with the migrant and refugee crisis at its highest point.

Orbán built a fence (wall) – a 110 mile fence on the border with Serbia and another fence on the border with Croatia. He exploits both the “victim myth” from that post WW I treaty and the “will to survive”.

“Even critics of the government’s harsh treatment of asylum seekers admitted that Orbán saw earlier than most of his EU colleagues that borders had to be controlled before a relocation plan for migrants could be agree upon.”

“[He] won back support by weaponizing the immigration issue.”

76% of the people of Hungary thought refugees would increase the likelihood of terrorism.

82% believed refugees too jobs and social benefits, creating a social burden.

Implications

Orbán has been influencing other post-communist states to join a nationalistic group which so far includes the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia.

“…to quote the chairman of the European Stability Initiative think tank, Gerald Knaus, [he is] the most dangerous man in the European Union.”

https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2018/04/viktor-Orbán-hungary/557246/

The following information is from an article in the New York Times by Patrick Kingsley on May 1, 2018.

“After Viktor Orbán’s Victory, Hungary’s Judges Start to Tumble”

Courts

A “flurry of judges began resigning in quick succession.”

“[O]ne of Mr. Orbán’s oldest friends and allies, Tunde Hando, has systematically packed the courts with loyalists in her role as chief of the judiciary for the past six years.”

Orbán is facing discipline “under a process known as the Article 7 procedure.

Censure could affect “the thinking of investors,” says Knaus.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/01/world/europe/hungary-viktor-Orbán-judges.html